Guggenheim Museum

Location: 1071 5th Ave, New York, NY 10128

Located on Fifth Avenue and East 89th Street and housed in one of the most iconic buildings in New York, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum’s collection is filled with prized pieces, including works from Picasso, Kandinsky and Miró. The Guggenheim always presents interesting and innovative exhibitions, and the museum’s layout is like no other, as visitors experience the artwork along a huge ramp that spirals up around the entire interior of the cylindrical building.

The Guggenheim Museum New York is at once a vital cultural center, an educational institution, and the heart of an international network of museums. At this wonderful New York art museum, visitors can experience special exhibitions of modern and contemporary art, lectures by artists and critics, performances and film screenings, classes for teens and adults, and daily tours of the galleries led by museum educators. Founded on a collection of early modern masterpieces, the Guggenheim Museum NY is an ever-evolving institution devoted to the art of the 20th century and beyond.

In 1943, architect Frank Lloyd Wright was commissioned to design a building to house the Museum of Non-Objective Painting, which had been established by the Solomon R. Guggenheim Foundation in 1939. After numerous delays, Wright’s masterpiece finally opened to the public on October 21, 1959, six months after his death, and was immediately recognized as an architectural icon. The Guggenheim Museum is arguably the most important building of Wright’s late career. A monument to modernism, the unique architecture of the space, with its spiral ramp riding to a domed skylight, continues to thrill visitors and provide a unique forum for the presentation of contemporary art.

In 2008, the Guggenheim was designated a National Historic Landmark; in 2015, along with nine other buildings designed by Frank Lloyd Wright, it was nominated by the United States to be included in the UNESCO World Heritage List.

Some of the Guggenheim Museum exhibits you don’t want to miss include:

Woman with Yellow Hair (1931), Pablo Picasso

Picasso was fond of depicting Marie-Thérèse Walter while she slept because he thought it captured her in her most vulnerable, intimate state. Here, she lays her head on an arm that looks like a fleshy, sensual extension of her flaxen locks.

Black Lines (1913), Vasily Kandinsky

No one with any assurance can point to the first truly abstract painting in art history, but this one comes pretty close. It is, oddly, the result of deliberately slow product rollout, at least according to the Guggenheim. Well before this canvas, Kandinsky knew precisely where he was headed with abstract art, but he was concerned with public reaction. In the paintings leading up to this one, he maintained tenuous connections to representation, before finally dispensing with them altogether here.

The Guggenheim NYC is open Mon, Wed, Fri and Sun 10am-5:45pm. Tues is the late night, hours are 10am-9pm. Sat hours are 10am-7:45pm, and between 5-7:45pm you may pay whatever you wish ($10 is suggested) to enter! (regular admission is $25 per person) Please note: The Museum is closed on Thursdays!!

Download a map of the Museum.

To visit the Guggenheim, hop on our Uptown & Harlem tour and hop off at Stop #25, it is right there!

 

This page was edited by Steven Thomas