TopView Sightseeing | New York

Additional Resources

Pedestrian Safety in the City

Unless you have a car, chances are good that you walk a lot of the time. Whether it's at home, at school, or at some other location, you probably feel like you know what it takes to be safe. When visiting or living in a city such as New York City, though, walking through the streets is often a more complicated and intense experience. If you're unfamiliar with the area, its laws, and the habits of city pedestrians, the risk of injury and even death increases. Fortunately, understanding a few basics can help make being a pedestrian in high-traffic urban areas a safer experience for yourself, drivers, and others on the street.

Bike Safety in the City

Whether they're taking part in organized bike tours or riding alone, many cyclists use city streets. Riding a bike through a busy city street is vastly different than riding in residential neighborhoods. With potential challenges including traffic jams, anxious drivers, and pedestrians rushing to get where they need to be, there's little wonder that some people feel uncomfortable with the idea of bicycling in urban areas. For them, the thought of riding a bike where there's so much congestion on the road may even seem scary and dangerous. The risk can be greatly diminished, however, when one knows and abides by the safety rules.

Cities With the Most Successful Professional Sports Teams

We analyzed every game played by every team in the four most popular professional sports leagues in the United States (NFL, MLB, NBA and NHL) over the past ten seasons, from 2008 to 2017. Across all four sports, 50,991 games were played. These are the cities and teams with the highest win percentages in the United States!

New York's Theatre History: Broadway

The word "Broadway" is special because it denotes both a profession and a place: the theater industry and a major boulevard running the length of Manhattan. While this may seem obvious to a New Yorker, many non-natives don't associate the two until they've stood on the sidewalks of Broadway. To make things even more confusing, many Broadway shows aren't actually on Broadway itself, and some of the shows that are staged on this famous street are labeled "off-Broadway." But even before the first American musical was staged, Broadway was an important street, a status it retains to this day.

NYC and the History of the Statue of Liberty

The Statue of Liberty is an icon that symbolizes the United States and the promise of freedom and hope. The torch-bearing statue with her crown and robe is one of the most easily recognized in the world. This famous landmark is extremely popular, and every year, the statue receives around four million visits from tourists. Despite its renowned status, people may not be as familiar with many of the facts associated with it or its history. One major fact that can easily be forgotten is that the Statue of Liberty was constructed in and transported from another country.

History Of NYC: From Trading Post to The Twin Towers

New York City is one of the most recognized cities in the world. It's known for its culture and diversity and as a financial center for the U.S. and countries across the globe. While it has grown to encompass all of these things today, NYC hasn't always been the grand city that the world has come to love. New York's evolution started in the 1600s, and the city has faced many challenges on the road to its many accomplishments. The city has been at the heart of a number of major events that have impacted history and changed the fate of not only the city but also the state, the country, and in some instances the world.

New York City and the Historical Ellis Island

Year after year, tourists flock to New York City to see the sights, going to the Empire State Building, taking NYC bus tours, and visiting Ellis Island. Some visit for fun, while others are interested in the history. For those who come in search of historical sites, a Statue of Liberty Tour is a must-see. More than a tourist stop, Ellis Island evokes feelings of fear and hope when reminiscing about the millions of immigrants who entered the United States through this historic place. Those feelings become more personal when realizing that statistics state that approximately 40 percent of United States citizens are descendants of Ellis Island immigrants. In fact, that is precisely why so many people want to visit Ellis Island: They hope to see original records of their relatives who were processed here and discover their family's stories.